11/12/2011

Naked and Famous "Slow Vintage" Slim Hoodie


Over the past few weeks, we have received numerous requests for the Naked & Famous "slow vintage" hoodies in the various colors. Today a large shipment just arrived and we will now stock all 4 colors: charcoal, navy, red, and gray.

Naked & Famous "slow vintage" hoodies are made with loopwheeled fabric produced on vintage tsuri circular knitting machines (loopwheel machines) from the late 1800's. These machines work very slowly and are labor intensive, but as a result produce the softest cotton fabrics. The loopwheeled fabric is made by the artisans in Wakayama, Japan and then shipped to Canada where Naked & Famous sew the fabrics into their slim hoodies.

Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in charcoal. 100% cotton. Fabric made in Japan. Assembled in Canada. Size XS-L. $142. For more information on the Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in charcoal, click here.

Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in navy. 100% cotton. Fabric made in Japan. Assembled in Canada. Size XS-L. $142. For more information on the Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in navy, click here.

Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in red. 100% cotton. Fabric made in Japan. Assembled in Canada. Size XS-L. $142. For more information on the Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in red, click here.

Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in gray. 100% cotton. Fabric made in Japan. Assembled in Canada. Size XS-L. $142. For more information on the Naked & Famous "slow vintage" slim hoodie in gray, click here.

Multi-color interior. The loopwheeled fabric is very soft and will become softer with wear.

Tsuri circular knitting machines, also known as a vintage loopwheel machines, were originally used in the early 1800's by Italian and French garment manufactures. Similar to the vintage denim shuttle looms abandoned by USA garment manufactures in the early 1900's, tsuri circular knitting machines were also abandoned and sold to make way to more modern mass production machinery. By 1910, Italian and French manufactures began selling their equipment, many of which purchased by Japanese factories. Only a few vintage tsuri circular knitting machines are still being used today as Japanese artisans continue the traditions of quality make with the use of these machines once thought of as being obsolete.

In Wakayama, one factory owns 100 of these precious machines and 50 still operate. Over the years, the factory's artisans made adjustments to the machines allowing them to knit heavier fabrics suitable for modern sportswear such as sweatshirts, parkas, and other knits. The machines take up to 1 hour to make only a meter of fabric, in fact, they move so slow that they can be stopped by hand and thus very labor consuming. This slow operating technique, "slow vintage" as referred by the Wakayama artisans, produces a fabric with far less tension in the yarn resulting in an incredible soft feel that cannot be replicated on modern day equipment.